Books – The King’s Speech

How I hate broadcasting.

Sure enough everybody has heard of a movie called The King’s Speech, as apart from being pretty good, it turned out to be the big winner in the 2010 edition of the Academy Awards, calling the attention of even more people. But what about the real story that inspired the movie? What about the real struggle of King George VI to fight his speech impediment? What about the real Lionel Logue who helped him stop stammering? What happened before and after the two men met?

Lionel’s grandson Mark Logue wondered these same questions and, encouraged by the production of the movie, started researching everywhere he could to discover the true story of The King’s Speech. Under this title and with the help of biographies authour Peter Conradi, he wrote a very interesting book gathering all that information.  Continue reading

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2 Responses to Books – The King’s Speech

  1. Sajib says:

    I heard it was historically misleading (the movie). Is that true?

    • fictionworms says:

      Yes, there are many fictional additions in the movie, and the order of events sometimes changed or tightened in a shorter period of time (if you want more details, there’s a part of Wikipedia’s article of The King’s Speech about historical accuracy). However, I don’t think this is actually bad. The movie’s intention, in my view, wasn’t to tell you facts like in a documentary, but rather move you and make you see how much the King suffered from his speech impediment, how much he worked to overcome it, how important the role of Logue was in this and how Bertie became a King despite the fact that he never wanted to be such a thing. And this is in my opinion, where the movie succeeds. But if you want accuracy, you should definitely go for the book or watch some documentary (BTW, I saw a great one on Discovery Channel, I think it was called The Real King’s Speech).

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